“Everyone has inside of him a piece of good news. The good news is that you don't know how great you can be!” - A. Frank

News and Announcements (2015)

10 November 2015

Details of a lecture by Richard Bryann Chua:

Title: Formal Verification of E-Voting Protocol

Abstract: E-voting has already been used in some countries. While some countries have successes with e-voting, some countries have failures with it and have opted to discontinue e-voting. Despite the efficiency that e-voting offers, there are still issues on the trust for e-voting, particularly on vote privacy and assurance that votes are recorded and counted correctly. In this lecture, we will discuss about the formal verification and analysis properties of e-voting systems on whether do they offer security, reliability and trustworthiness.

Date: 12 November 2015

Time: 16:00h to 17:00h, GMT+8

Venue: Room 317

This lecture is open to the public.


14 October 2015

Details of a lecture by Jeffrey Aborot:

Title: Quantum approximate string matching for large alphabets

Abstract: In this lecture we present a quantum algorithm for finding approximate copies of a pattern within a much longer text. The algorithm is based mainly on amplitude amplification technique used in Grover’s quantum search algorithm and is more suited for instances in which the size of the alphabet of the text and the pattern is large. The algorithm is composed of a filtering phase for trimming the search space and a verification phase for determining valid so- lutions. We also present details of each subroutine used in the algorithm and possible quantum circuit implementation for each of its step. The algorithm returns all solution indices within the text with number of iterations propor- tional to the ratio of the size of the text and the number of distinct symbols in the pattern with high probability.

Date: 15 October 2015

Time: 16:00h to 17:30h, GMT+8

Venue: Room 317

This lecture is open to the public.

06 October 2015

Details of a lecture by Jasmine A. Malinao:

Title: On Building Multidimensional Workflows for  Complex Systems Modelling

Abstract: In this research, we shall consider both aggregate and algorithmic complexity in building a multidimensional model where all three workflow dimensions are unified. Considering the multidimensionality of our proposed model, we define model properties for such systems and create verification schemes to check for their existence in these models. These properties are adopted from the case- and process-driven workflows (e.g. Petri nets, workflow-nets etc.). (Like Petri nets and workflow-nets, models in literature are defined under at most two dimensions of workflows with one diagram typically representing only one specific scenario (or some part thereof).) By doing so, we ensure that models of complex systems which are built using our framework are functionally-credible and robust system representations even for models which are multi-scenario and have multi-type compositionality. In addition to these, introduce volatility in the model itself, apparent in node and arc metadata resets, with rules of construction for a more effective representation of complex systems. Finally, on the perspective of algorithmic complexity, we describe computationally hard problems for scenario extraction and devise an algorithm to extract scenarios from our proposed model. Scenarios describe the the events which take place from (continuous and varying) external stimuli introduced into a complex system wherefore unique or multiple outputs are produced. In essence, the behavioral and temporal aspect of operation of complex systems are encapsulated in these scenario profiles. From these profiles, we can build an interaction, communication, and functions maps listing out maximally-composed subgroups of components wherein emergent behaviors of regularities and disorders could be expected. We shall account the resolutions, strengths, and frequencies of interactions and communications on these maps.  (These sets of information can be used by modellers to obtain points- or subgroups-of interest for fault detection and diagnosis for complex systems.)

Date: 08 October 2015

Time: 14:30h to 16:00h, GMT+8

Venue: Room 317

This lecture is open to the public.





23 September 2015

Details of a lecture by Geoffrey Solano:

Title: Some Fundamental Centrality Measures on Networks

Abstract: The past years have revealed an increasing universal fascination with complex “connections” and “relationships”. Though this has been most evident and appreciated in the area of social networks, it is in no way confined to it. Trade, ecology and biology are just some domains where interconnection networks are ubiquitous - and graphs have proven to be the most fitting model for these. Consequently, properties and algorithms in graph theory have been called on to derive essential information among these interconnection networks. Among the most useful properties in graph theory is centrality, which is a measure of which nodes are most important in the network. The lecture will provide insights on some of the most fundamental measures of centrality, namely: Degree, Betweenness, Closeness, Eigenvector, Pagerank and Katz centrality.

Date: 24 September 2015

Time: 16:30h to 17:30h, GMT+8

Venue: Room 317

This lecture is open to the public.





08 September 2015

Details on a lecture by Nestine Hernandez:

Title: A Recognizing Enzymatic Numerical P System Solving the 3SAT Problem

Abstract: Enzymatic Numerical P system is an extension of numerical P systems which are computation models that takes inspiration from economics as well as cell structures. In this talk, we attempt to describe a family of enzymatic numerical P systems that solves the 3-satisfiability problem.

Date: 10 September, 2015

Time: 14:30h - 16:00h, GMT+8

Venue: Room 317

This lecture is open to the public.


10 August 2015

Details on a lecture by Jhoirene Clemente:

Title: Online Algorithms and Advice Complexity

Abstract: Many real world problems arise in so-called online environments. In these environments, information arrives in a piecewise manner and decisions are needed to be made without incomplete information about the future. Problems arising in such environments are called online problems and algorithms solving these problems are called online algorithms. In contrast, problems with complete information of the input are called offline algorithms. Not knowing the whole input is a huge disadvantage for online problems and so optimality is not always guaranteed even for problems that are polynomial-time solvable in the offline setting. Some examples of online problems are the paging problem, the ski-rental problem, and the time-series search problem. Algorithms for these problems are analyzed using competitive ratio, which is the worst ratio between the cost of the online  algorithm with respect to the offline counterpart. In this lecture, we will provide an introduction to online algorithms and competitive analysis. We will also provide an overview of advice complexity, which is used to measure the minimum amount of information needed by an online algorithm to be optimal. We will provide in this lecture some interesting questions about the advice complexity of online algorithms.

Date: 27 August, 2015

Time: 16:30h - 17:30h, GMT+8

Venue: Room 317

This lecture is open to the public.



10 August 2015

Details on a lecture by Jhoirene Clemente:

Title: Online Algorithms and Advice Complexity

Abstract: Many real world problems arise in so-called online environments. In these environments, information arrives in a piecewise manner and decisions are needed to be made without incomplete information about the future. Problems arising in such environments are called online problems and algorithms solving these problems are called online algorithms. In contrast, problems with complete information of the input are called offline algorithms. Not knowing the whole input is a huge disadvantage for online problems and so optimality is not always guaranteed even for problems that are polynomial-time solvable in the offline setting. Some examples of online problems are the paging problem, the ski-rental problem, and the time-series search problem. Algorithms for these problems are analyzed using competitive ratio, which is the worst ratio between the cost of the online  algorithm with respect to the offline counterpart. In this lecture, we will provide an introduction to online algorithms and competitive analysis. We will also provide an overview of advice complexity, which is used to measure the minimum amount of information needed by an online algorithm to be optimal. We will provide in this lecture some interesting questions about the advice complexity of online algorithms.

Date: 27 August, 2015

Time: 16:30h - 17:30h, GMT+8

Venue: Room 317

This lecture is open the public.



07 August 2015

Details of a lecture by Jan Michael Yap:

Title: Algorithmics in Data Visualization

Abstract: The lecture is a retelling of Enrico Bertini's blog article entitled "The Role of Algorithms in Data Visualization" (http://fellinlovewithdata.com/research/the-role-of-algorithms-in-data-visualization). The lecture aims to show the importance of algorithmics in aid of data visualization. Examples of algorithms for use in spatial layoutting, encoding visual features, abstracting data, and measuring visualization quality would be given and discussed to highlight the role of algorithms in visualizing data and information.

Date: 13 August, 2015

Time: 16:30h - 17:30h, GMT+8

Venue: Room 317

This lecture is open the public.



03 August 2015

ACLab welcomes its new batch of undergraduate researchers for AY 2015-2016:


  • Argarin, Paul John
  • Carandang, Jym Paul
  • Castillo, Algina
  • Gapuz, Katrina
  • Jimenez, Joni Marie
  • Joaquin, Neil Jonathan
  • Lagunda, Ann Renzel
  • Mendoza, Ephraim
  • Palaganas, Genesis Ian
  • Villaflores, John Matthew


31 July 2015

The Graduate Lecture Series session for August 6 will now feature a double bill with Ms. Klarizze Romero, ACLab undergraduate researcher, presenting her work prior to Ms. Juayong's lecture. Details of Ms. Romero's presentation is as follows:

Title: Modification and parallelization of the qPMS7 Algorithm

Abstract:  Repeating subpatterns in DNA sequences are called motifs and finding them is important in the field of biology. There are many algorithms to solve the Planted Motif Search like PMS1, PMSPrune, and PMS5, but Planted Motif Search (PMS) has been shown to be a NP-Hard problem. In this study, we modified an exact algorithm, qPMS7, to be able to design
a parallel algorithm to speed up the finding of motifs. Time complexity analysis show that the ratio of the time complexity of the original qPMS7 algorithm to the parallelized modified qPMS7 algorithm given a binary alphabet is at most (2^l)/l.

Date: 06 August, 2015 (Thursday)

Time: 16:00h - 17:00h GMT+8

Venue: Room 317, Dept. of Computer Science, UP AECH (tentatively)

Ms. Juayong's lecture is now slated to start at 18:00h. This lecture is open to the public.



20 July 2015

Updates on a lecture by Richelle Juayong:


Title: Language computations in ECPe systems vis-a-vis Transition P systems

Abstract:  In this lecture we recall the syntax and semantics of ECPe systems and Transition P systems. Next, we provide procedures so that a given ECPe system can precisely generate a set L that is generated by a given Transition P system. The main goal of this lecture is to review such existing procedures and outline further research directions and open problems of interest in this topic.


Date: 06 August, 2015 (Thursday)

Time: 16:30h - 18:00h GMT+8

Venue: Room 317, Dept. of Computer Science, UP AECH (tentatively)

This lecture is open to the public.



14 July 2015

Ms. Richelle Juayong will provide a lecture about ECPe systems and TP systems. Tentative lecture details are as follows:

Title: TBA

Date: 29 July, 2015 (Wednesday)

Time: 13:30h - 14:30h (1:30pm to 2:30pm) GMT+8

Venue: Room 317, Dept. of Computer Science, UP AECH (tentatively)

This lecture is open to the public.



12 July 2015

NEW schedule for Ms. Ivy Ordanel's lecture on posets and P-systems: 

Date: 15 July 2015 (Wednesday)

Time: 13:00h - 14:00h (1:00pm - 2:00pm) GMT+8

Venue: Room 317, Dept. of Computer Science, UP AECH (tentatively)



Details of a lecture by F. Cabarle:

Title: Some research directions to using SNP systems for solutions to hard problems.

Abstract: This lecture first recalls some literature regarding solutions to hard problems using SNP systems. Next, some challenges related to open problems or future research directions in the SNP systems framework are provided. The main goal is to allow these challenges to be made available to computer scientists and similar disciplines: for senior undergraduate (sub-problems of the challenges) or graduate levels.

Date: 22 July, 2015 (Wednesday)

Time: 13:30h - 14:30h (1:30pm to 2:30pm) GMT+8

Venue: Room 317, Dept. of Computer Science, UP AECH (tentatively)


Both lectures are open to the public.



08 July 2015

Ms. Ivy Ordanel's lecture on posets and P-systems was postponed due to suspension of work and classes by the University administration in view of inclement weather. Her lecture will be rescheduled on a later date, to be announced within the next week.



04 July 2015


Ms. Ivy Ordanel will give a lecture on problem(s) related to posets, positing solutions using P systems. Further details:

Date: 08 July 2015 (Wednesday)
Time: 13:30 (01:30PM) GMT+8
Venue: Room 317 (tentatively), Department of Computer Science, UP Alumni Engineers Centennial Hall, Velasquez St., UP Diliman, Quezon City.

The general public is invited to this lecture.



11 June 2015

ACLab congratulates Mr. Francis George Cabarle for finishing his requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Computer Science!


Dr. Cabarle is the 2nd graduate of the Ph.D. in Computer Science program of the University of the Philippines Diliman. LLAP! \\//,



10 May 2015

Mr. Francis George Cabarle will be defending his Ph.D. dissertation. Here are the details:

Computations in Spiking Neural P-Systems: Simulations and Structural Plasticity
by Francis George Cabarle

Date:     20 May 2015
Time:    15:00 - 17:00
Venue:  ERDT Room, UP Alumni Engineers Centennial Hall, Velasquez St., UP Diliman, Quezon City

Abstract can be downloaded HERE. The event is open to the general public.



5 May 2015

Congratulations to the ACLab's very own lab head, Henry N. Adorna, for being one of the recipients of this year's UP Diliman Gawad Chanselor para sa Natatanging Guro!




More details HERE.



21 April 2015

Mr. Francis George Cabarle will be holding a colloquium in preparation for his Ph.D. dissertation defense. Below are the details:

A Class of Computing Models Inspired by Spiking Neurons
by Francis George Cabarle

Date : 23 April 2015, Thursday
Time :16:30 to 18:30
Venue: ERDT Room, 2/F UPAECH, Eng'g Complex

Details of the colloquium can be found HERE.



03 April 2015

Ms. Richelle Ann B. Juayong will be defending her Ph.D. dissertation proposal. Here are the details:

Communication Complexity in Evolution-Communication P-Systems with and without Energy
by Richelle Ann B. Juayong

Date : 08 April 2015 
Time : 14:00 to 15:00 
Venue: Conference Room, UP Alumni Engineers Centennial Hall